Assessment of flooded properties

Gatineau's Service d'évaluation will be inspecting certain properties that were damaged in the spring flooding. These inspections will help to compile data on the properties. The following answers to frequently asked questions will provide some useful information or call 819-243-5594.

Is the actual value of the properties affected?

Yes, the value of the flooded properties is affected. The value of all of the properties along the river or of those in a particular sector may also be affected. This will be confirmed with the analysis of the next property sales.

What is the municipal assessor required to do?

The assessor is responsible for keeping the assessment roll up to date to ensure that it is physically and legally current. This ensures that the roll reflects the actual value of the properties, that is to say at July 1, 2013 for Gatineau's 2015 roll and the applicable fiscal years, that is to say 2015, 2016 and 2017.

What events could result in an amendment to the current assessment roll?

The Act respecting municipal taxation lists a number of situations where the assessor must intervene, including destruction, disappearance and demolition. Not every event will result in a modification to the roll.

In order for my property value to be reduced, do I have to qualify for the Quebec government's ministère de la Sécurité publique financial assistance program?

No. However, the assessor recommends that flood victims fill out the Questionnaire – 2017 Flood form. The form was prepared by Gatineau's Service d'évaluation, and will be sent to the owners of buildings that may have been flooded. The form will be mailed out at the same time as the tax payment deferral document, in mid-June 2017.

What will the assessor do to determine the condition of the properties?

Service d'évaluation assessors and technicians will first collect information through the completed questionnaires. They will then determine which properties should be visited. After visiting the properties, the assessor will decide on a case-by-case basis how to intervene and what value to assign to the roll. If appropriate, he will amend the roll. That amendment will be retroactive to the day of the event.

How will the assessor estimate the loss of value for a property?

The assessor will determine the loss of value for a property using recognized assessment methods. Those are the same methods that are used to prepare the roll.

How long will it take?

For the 2017 flooding, the Act respecting municipal taxation provides that the assessor must act no later than December 31, 2018.

If a value is amended, how long will it apply?

The amendment will be retroactive to the date of the event, and will apply until the renovation work is completed. Consequently, if the destruction was partial, its value will be retroactively amended to the date of the flooding, and will remain effective until the restoration work is completed.

How will property owners be informed about the assessor's decision?

A formal notice will be sent to property owners informing them of the amendment and of their right to contest it.

After the renovation work has been completed, will the value of my property increase?

Not necessarily. Once the renovation work has been completed, Service d'évaluation inspectors will visit the properties. Based on the information compiled, the assessor will determine the impact on the value of renovation work and decide on the amendment to be made.

For a property located in the damaged sector but that was not flooded, will the assessor intervene?

No. The Act respecting municipal taxation does not permit the assessor to modify a roll based on financial considerations.

Will municipal taxes be lower?

The property taxes based on the value will be adjusted based on changes in the value set by the Service de l'évaluation.

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